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Kit's Alter Ego
September 20, 2003, 12:20 PM
Visualize the following: a young man--let's call him, oh, Kit FitzSimons--wants to start an improv company at a community college he attends--let's say Durham Tech.

Now, "Kit" has never founded an improv company before and knows slightly more than jack squat about the best way to do so.

The school requires a set of Bylaws, a staff advisor, and "student interest"--of which "Kit" has so far "rustled up" about half (of each...i.e. sample bylaws for a blueprint, a tentative advisor, and four potential improvers, whose interests in the group range from nonchalant to rabidity(sic)).

Q: Supposing that all polygons involved are regular, and given that the speed of light is approximately 186,000 mps, what advise can you give "Kit" that will aid him in his quest? (Assume that "student interest" is compound.)

CoreyBrown
September 20, 2003, 04:17 PM
Don't half ass it. And when I say that I mean it. Starting a group is a lot of work and a lot of dedication. Get everything you need to get it off the ground before you move in any particular direction. Create your "constitution" with your ideas on how the governing body will work.

Find the students who want to do it and get them crazy interested in it. Make sure they understand that it isn't just something to do, but something that can become something more. Everyone should be in the same mind frame.

Then hit up a teacher to support you all and then get the ball rolling with practices.

Main advice is do it, or don't do it. You can't run the middle in any way.

EthanK
September 20, 2003, 09:44 PM
I can't re-enforce Cory's point about finding enthusiastic members enough. That was the key to the successful performances in high school, and college. Audiences can smell the folks who don't put their all into it. As I posted in the IRC, our troupe had a "come one, come all" policy and was swamped with like 30 girls who thought they were actresses but didn't do anything. They didn't say anything, they sat quietly and expected to get stage time. It was frustrating, like swimming with clothes on. But, as usually happens, the really dedicated people would practice at kid's homes, in the hall, during the free periods, on weekends and we got a great troupe together that pulled everyone else along. If you don't have that dedication, you're in trouble.

The Dynamo
September 26, 2003, 01:44 PM
First of all, only take people who are REALLY FUNNY, that way, the audience will be sure to come back to see what CRAZY ANTICS your "group" can come up with next time! Oh and there's nothing more HILARIOUS than lots of ZANY PROPS and COSTUMES! Be sure to pick up some SILLY BUBBA TEETH for your REDNECK CHARACTERS. Believe you me, there's nothing an audience enjoys more than seeing a scene about HILLBILLIES ARGUING! (Except maybe if someone can pull out their CHRISTOPHER WALKEN impression in the midst of it all! Ha, ha!) If you follow those rules, you should have a successful troupe in no time.

Good luck!

Kit's Alter Ego
September 26, 2003, 04:22 PM
First of all, only take people who are REALLY FUNNY, that way, the audience will be sure to come back to see what CRAZY ANTICS your "group" can come up with next time! Oh and there's nothing more HILARIOUS than lots of ZANY PROPS and COSTUMES!

This reminds me of how my old college improv troupe always advertised and/or introduced our shows with "Have you seen 'Whose Line Is It Anyway'? It's kind of like that." Not that the shows were scripted, blocked and hosted by a soon-to-be-failed game-show-host, but that's how the hype went.

Well, that and such sidewalk chalkings as:
More Fun Than A Barrel Of Frozen Dwarves!

Less Conspiratorial Than Alphabet Soup!

and

Award-Winning Improv, As Long As You Only Ask Freshman Orientation Coordinators!

So, we were less sell-outs or wackos than..."a diverse group of individuals."

--Kit

PS: All right. Who wins the pool for how long it would take before 'Whose Line' showed up on this forum?